Le terze rime di Dante

Autore ALIGHIERI, Dante (1265-1321).
Tipografo Aldus Manutius
Dati tipografici Venice, 
Prezzo Venduto/Sold
Le terze rime di Dante

In nearly contemporary vellum

 

8vo (158x95 mm). [244] leaves. Collation: a-z8 A-G8 H4. Leaf l2 is a blank. Aldine device on last leaf verso. Italic and roman type. Contemporary or slightly later vellum over boards, spine with three raised bands, edges gilt and gauffered. A nice copy with good margins.

FIRST ALDINE EDITION of Dante's Commedia, in the issue containing the first appearance of the Aldine device – a dolphin wrapped around an anchor – used thereafter in all Aldine publications. The edition – which Manutius titled simply Le terze rime, in contrast to tradition – signals a linguistic restoration of the work and an important development in the recovery of the original text. It was carefully prepared by the Venetian patrician and humanist Pietro Bembo (1470-1547), who used as his primary source an authoritative mid-fourteenth-century manuscript taken from the library of his father, Bernardo, which Boccaccio had sent as a gift to Petrarch between 1351 and 1353 (Biblioteca Vaticana, ms Vat. lat. 3199). The second identified source is the Landino edition of 1481, which had become the standard text of the Commedia by the end of the fifteenth century. According to Bembo's own notes in the copy-text – now in the Vatican Library – the editorial work began on 6 July 1501 and was finished on 26 July 1502. Aldus published the text in August 1502; it is assumed that Bembo sent the quires in sequence to the printer as he finished work on them.

The Aldine Dante is quite different to all previous editions of the poem. For the first time the Commedia is set in italic type and printed in the easily portable octavo format, unencumbered by the extensive commentary which, from the Vindeliniana onwards, had always accompanied Dante's cantiche in the earlier and larger format editions. The colophon is followed by Aldus's warning against counterfeited editions, “Cautum est ne quis hunc impune imprimat, uendat ue librum nobis inuitis”.

“The poetry of the Comedy emerged from beneath a sea of exegetical commentary for the first time in more than twenty years in this edition produced by the most celebrated printer and publisher of Renaissance Italy, Aldus Manutius. The text differed radically from the Landino vulgate which had established itself during the last decades of the 15th century. The text of the 1502 Aldine, which was to become the vulgate for the next 300 years, was prepared by no less than the literary arbiter of the Italian High Renaissance, the Venetian humanist and courtier Pietro Bembo (1470-1547). Bembo had already prepared for Aldus in 1501 an influential edition of Petrarch's Canzoniere. Together with his 1502 Dante, Bembo's editions of the vernacular Italian classics represent the practical (and polemical) point of departure for the Venetian's promotion of a vernacular literary tradition. His efforts in the philological, editorial, and poetic arenas led to a general recognition of a distinguished vernacular tradition worthy of canonization no less than the Latin and Greek traditions idolized by the humanists. Bembo's linguistic and rhetorical reform of the Italian vernacular found its mature expression in his vernacular humanist manifesto Le prose della volgar lingua (1525), where the Venetian proposed the 14th-century classics Petrarch and Boccaccio as vernacular models for poetry and prose respectively, just as Virgil and Cicero served as humanist models for Latin eloquence. Thus, the linguistic provocation of the non-Tuscan incunable editions of the Comedy to which Landino had responded in 1481 was renewed at the beginning of the 16th century by this Aldine edition of the poem. Bembo, a member of the Venetian patriciate, presumed to teach the Florentines about their own vernacular classic and their own language. In fact, Bembo's edition was undertaken with a philological acumen unprecedented for vernacular works and unusual even for Latin classics. For the first time, the text's abbreviations were explained and the words divided according to grammar. Punctuation is abundant, and the use of the apostrophe and many accents are regularized. Most importantly however, Bembo circumvented the corrupted 15th-century Landino vulgate by basing his text upon an authoritative 14th-century manuscript of the poem, which, originally a gift of Boccaccio's to Petrarch (Vat. lat. 3199), had found its way into the formidable library of Bembo's father, Bernardo. Bembo copied out the entire text in his own hand (Vat. lat. 3197) and presented the copy to Aldus for printing. It was as if the poem had never been printed before: the 15th-century vulgate was swept aside. Bembo's text was to become the basis for every subsequent edition of the Divine Comedy until the late 19th century. The result was a linguistic restoration of the work to Dante's own pre-humanistic age. While Bembo's edition represented a radical improvement of the text from an objectively philological perspective, it also had the effect of revealing the distance between Dante and the rhetorical sensibilities of the High Renaissance, whose idol was increasingly the urbane and psychologically exquisite Petrarch” (Renaissance Dante in Print 1472-1629, at www.italnet.nd.edu/Dante/text/1502.venice.html).

M. Palumbo, Dante Fifty Books, New York, 2016, no. 16; Edit 16, CNCE1144; C. de Batines, Bibliografia Dantesca, Prato, 1845, I, pp. 60-62; G. Mambelli, Gli annali delle edizioni dantesche, Bologna, 1931, no. 17; A.A. Renouard, Annales de l'imprimérie des Aldes, Paris, 1834 (ma Bologna, 1953), p. 34.5; A Catalogue of the Ahmanson-Murphy Aldine Collection at UCLA. Fasc. I: The Publications of Aldus Manutius the Elder, Berkeley, 1989, no. 59; Adams, D-83; Gamba, no. 385.

  • Le terze rime di Dante
  • Le terze rime di Dante
  • Le terze rime di Dante
  • Le terze rime di Dante
  • Le terze rime di Dante