Rettorica, et Poetica d'Aristotile tradotte di greco in lingua vulgare fiorentina da Bernardo Segni gentil'huomo, & accademico fiorentino

Autore: ARISTOTELES (384-322 a.C.)-SEGNI, Bernardo (1504-1558)

Tipografo: Lorenzo Torrentino

Dati tipografici: Firenze, 1549


SET OF THREE VOLUMES BOUND FOR COUNT DOMENICO ROSA MORANDO FROM VERONA

 

4to (216x137 mm). [12], 355, [25] pp. Collation: [leaf]6 A-Z4 AA-ZZ4 AAA6. The final leaf AAA6 is a blank. Woodcut initials. Aristotle's text printed in roman type, commentary in italics. 18th-century vellum over boards with overlapping edges, gilt spine with morocco lettering piece, light blue edges, green silk bookmark (spine slightly foxed). On the front pastedown 18th-century engraved armorial bookplate of Count Domenico Rosa Morando from Verona and, above, later printed label “Dott. Antonio Zambelli (Sgarzerie, Verona)”. Repair to the upper margin of the title page not affecting the text, some quires slightly browned, but a very good, wide-margined copy.

FIRST EDITION. “Bernardo Segni's translation of Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric were first printed in Florence in 1549, though the author had been working on them for several years, as confirmed by the manuscript (autograph) version of the Rhetoric now in the Marucelliana Library (ms. C.333, where the dedicatory epistle to the duke of Florence Cosimo I de Medici is dated 1546, instead of 1548 which is the date of the epistle in the first printed edition). Segni offers the readers an Italian translation of Aristotle with a commentary on the texts concerned (the commentary on Aristotle's Rhetoric appears in the Marucelliana ms. in a sort of preliminary and shorter version)” (E. Refini, Trattato dei governi di Aristotile, in: “Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy Database VARIDB”, online database).

Edit 16, CNCE2927; Moreni, pp. 44-46; Cranz-Schmitt 108.221; S. Bionda, Poetica d'Aristotile tradotta di greco in lingua vulgare fiorentina da Bernardo Segni gentiluomo et accademico fiorentino, Rome, 2015; S. Bionda, La Poetica di Aristotele volgarizzata: Bernardo Segni e le sue fonti, in: “Aevum”, 2001, LXXV, pp. 679-94; S. Bionda, Aristotele in Accademia: Bernardo Segni e il volgarizzamento della Retorica, in: “Medioevo e Rinascimento”, 2002, XVI / n.s. XIII, pp. 241-65; S. Bionda, Un “traduttor dei traduttori”? Bernardo Segni dalla “Retorica” alla “Poetica”, in: “Aristotele fatto volgare: Aristotelian philosophy and the vernacular in the Renaissance (Atti del convegno, Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore, 27-28 settembre 2012)”, D. Lines & E. Refini, eds., Pisa, 2014, pp. 77-97.

 

(offered together with:)

 

ARISTOTELES (384-322 BC)-SEGNI, Bernardo (1504-1558). Trattato dei governi di Aristotile tradotto di greco in lingua vulgare fiorentina da Bernardo Segni […] Florence, Lorenzo Torrentino, 1549.

4to (221x132 mm). 420, [20] pp. Collation: A-Z4 Aa-Zz4 Aaa-Iii4. Woodcut initials. Aristotle's text printed in roman type, commentary in italics. 18th-century vellum over boards with overlapping edges, gilt spine with morocco lettering piece, green silk bookmark. On the front pastedown 18th-century engraved armorial bookplate of Count Domenico Rosa Morando from Verona and, above, later printed label “Dott. Antonio Zambelli (Sgarzerie, Verona)”. Old repair to the lower outer corner of l. G4 not affecting the text, some scattered browning, but a very good, wide-margined copy with several contemporary manuscripts notes (slightly faded) at the beginning of the volume on the margins of book 1 of the treatise.

FIRST EDITION. “Bernardo Segni's Trattato dei governi is a translation of (and commentary on) Aristotle's Politics. The work, published in 1549 and later reprinted (1551, 1559), was ready in 1548 - as confirmed by the dedicatory epistle to the Duke of Florence, Cosimo I de Medici, as well as by the autograph copy now in the Archivio di Stato of Florence (Cerchi 94). This copy, rich in annotations and corrections by Segni himself, is the text employed by the printer Lorenzo Torrentino and has been the object of a thorough study by Simone Bionda (La copia di tipografia del “Trattato dei Governi” di Bernardo Segni: breve incursione nel laboratorio del volgarizzatore di Aristotele, in: “Rinascimento”, 2002, II s., XLII, pp. 381-414)” (E. Refini, Trattato dei governi di Aristotile, in: “Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy Database VARIDB”, online database).

Edit 16, CNCE2928; Moreni, pp. 66-67; Cranz-Schmitt, 108.158.

 

(offered together with:)

 

ARISTOTELES (384-322 BC)-SEGNI, Bernardo (1504-1558). L'Ethica d'Aristotile tradotta in lingua vulgare fiorentina et comentata per Bernardo Segni. Florence, 1550 (Colophon: Florence, Lorenzo Torrentino, August 1550).

4to (218x138 mm). 547, [13] pp. Collation: a-z4 A-Z4 Aa-Zz4 AA4. The final leaf AA4 is a blank. Register, privilege and colophon at l. AA3v. Title within an architectural woodcut border including the Medici coat-of-arms and a view of Florence. Decorated initials and several woodcut diagrams in text. Italic types. 18th-century vellum over boards with overlapping edges, gilt spine with morocco lettering piece, green silk bookmark. On the front pastedown 18th-century engraved armorial bookplate of Count Domenico Rosa Morando from Verona and, above, later printed label “Dott. Antonio Zambelli (Sgarzerie, Verona)”. Some light marginal staining and foxing, but a very good, wide-margined copy.

FIRST EDITION. “Bernardo Segni's translation of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, dedicated to the duke Cosimo I, appeared in 1550 and was reprinted in Venice a year later. The work - apparently based on the Greek text - includes a commentary by Segni himself” (E. Refini, Trattato dei governi di Aristotile, in: “Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy Database VARIDB”, online database).

Edit 16, CNCE2929; Moreni, pp. 104-105; Cranz-Schmitt, 108.176; U. Langer, Aristotle commentary and ethical behaviour: Bernardo Segni on friendship between unequals (Ethica d'Aristotile tradotta in lingua fiorentina et commentata, 1550), in: “Philosophy in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Conversations with Aristotle”, C. Blackwell & S. Kusukawa, eds., 1999, pp. 107-125; D.A. Lines, Rethinking Renaissance Aristotelianism: Bernardo Segni's Ethica, the Florentine Academy, and the Vernacular, in: “Renaissance Quarterly”, 66.3, Fall 2013, pp. 824-65.

 

A fine set comprising three of the four translations from Aristotle's works by Bernardo Segni, the only ones to have appeared while the author was still alive; the fourth, on De Anima, was printed posthumously in Florence by Marescotti in 1583 under the title Il trattato sopra i libri dell'anima d'Aristotile. The three volumes have been bound in a uniform manner, but not at the same time, most likely by their late eighteenth-century owner, Count Domenico Rosa Morando, whose armorial bookplate appears in all three volumes.

“Bernardo Segni was a prominent figure in the cultural landscape of Florence and an active participant in the Accademia Fiorentina in the 1540s and 1550s. He published several significant translations of and commentaries on Aristotelian works in the vernacular, attempting to match the sophistication of previous Latin interpretations, on which he heavily relied. He was also an active political figure and penned acute observations on the events of his time (and in particular on the role of Duke Cosimo) in his Istorie fiorentine, published only long after his death. He also prepared a translation of Sophocles' Oedipus. Segni published translations of and commentaries on Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics, Politics, and Nicomachean Ethics, along with one of De anima that appeared posthumously […] Although it is his historical works that have caught the eye, Segni's greatest achievement was as an interpreter and disseminator of Aristotle's works in the vernacular […] His publication in 1549–1550 of the four Aristotelian works listed above was the fruit of several years of labor and was the expression of one of the earliest cultural programs to offer a unified perspective of the Philosopher in the Italian language. He availed himself of a number of Latin models (including the commentaries of Donato Acciaiuoli and Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples, the translations of Leonardo Bruni, Johannes Argyropoulos, and Francesco Robortello, the expertise and insights of Pier Vettori) and was not himself a philosopher or greatly original; nonetheless, he offered an intelligent synthesis of various interpretations that spoke to the cultural climate of Florence in the 1540s. In particular, he offered his fellow members of the Florentine Academy accessible translations and high-level commentary in a way that complemented the approaches of Benedetto Varchi and Giambattista Gelli. His Ethics commentary, for instance, makes numerous references to Dante and to Italian historical events. His commentary on the Politics is obsequious toward the Academy's patron, Cosimo I. Segni's activity, however, must be seen within the context of the interest of other contemporary figures (including Sperone Speroni, Antonio Brucioli, Alessandro Piccolomini, and others) in encouraging the study of philosophy in the volgare, which had recently attained new status in Italy after the long debates on the questione della lingua” (D.A. Lines, Segni, Bernardo, in: “Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy”, M. Sgarbi, ed., New York, 2015, s.v.).


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